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What is meant by geotextiles?
Jan 13, 2018

Geotextiles are a kind of geosynthetic material that has become more and more popular over the past fifteen years. The material owes its success in more than 80 applications to a significant extent to its resistance to biodegradation. Geotextiles are indeed textiles, however not in the traditional sense of the word. They are no natural materials like cotton, wool or silk. Geotextiles are synthetic fibers that can be made into a flexible, porous, nonwoven needlefelt fabric.

They are porous to water flow, to a varying degree. Because of this wide variety, they can be applied in at least five diverse ways:

1). Separation

Geotextiles will prevent two soil layers of different particle sizes from mixing with each other, as is illustrated the image below.

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Geo-textile as a Separator

2). Drainage

Geotextiles will efficiently collect superfluous water from structures, such as rainwater or surplus water, from the soil and discharge it.

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Geo-textile as a drain

3). Filtration

Geotextiles are an ideal interface for reverse filtration in the soil adjacent to the geotextile. In all soils water allows fine particles to be moved. Part of these particles will be halted at the filter interface; some will be halted within the filter itself while the rest will pass into the drain. The complex needle-punched structure of the geotextile enables the retention of fine particles without reducing the permeability of the drain.

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Geo-textile as a Drain

4). Reinforcement

Heavy geotextiles can be used to reinforce earth structures by means of fill materials. Thanks to their high soil fabric friction coefficient and high tensile strength, they are an ideal reinforcement solution.


Geo-textile as a Reinforcement

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5). Protection

Geotextiles are an ideal protection from erosion of earth embankments by wave action, currents or repeated drawdown. A layer of geotextiles can be placed so as to prevent leaching of fine material. They can be used for rock beaching or as mattress structures. They can even easily be placed under water.

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Geo-textiles as a protection.

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Functions of Geo-textile

A geotextile is typically defined as any permeable textile material used to increase soil stability, provide erosion control or aid in drainage. More simply put, if it is made of fabric and buried in the ground it is probably a geotextile.

Geotextiles have been in use for thousands of years dating back to the Egyptian Pharaohs. These early geotextile applications were basically natural fiber or vegetation mixed directly with soil. Modern geotextiles are usually made from a synthetic polymer such as polypropylene, polyester, polyethylene and polyamides. Geotextiles can be woven, knitted or non-woven. Varying polymers and manufacturing processes result in an array of geotextiles suitable for a variety of civil construction applications.

It is believed that the first modern applications of geotextiles were woven industrial fabrics used in 1950’s. One of the earliest documented cases was a waterfront structure built in Florida in 1958. This installation involved The Coastal Engineering Lab at the University of Florida and took place on private property that had been severely eroded by storms.

The first modern nonwoven geotextile was developed in 1968 by the Rhone Poulence company in France. It was a comparatively thick needle-punched polyester used in dam construction in France during 1970.

What is now considered as the first International Conference on Geotextiles took place in 1977 in Paris. The word "geotextile" was coined by Dr. J.P. Giroud in a pa per presented at the conference.

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Dr. J.P.Giroud

Non-woven geotextiles resemble felt and provide planar water flow. They are commonly known as filter fabrics, although woven monofilament geotextiles can also be referred to as filter fabrics. Typical applications for non-woven geotextiles include aggregate drains, asphalt pavement overlays and erosion control.

A woven geotextile is a planar textile structure produced by interlacing two or more sets of strands at right angles. There are two types of strands: slit films, which are flat; and monofilaments, which are round. Woven slit-film geotextiles are generally preferred for applications where high strength properties are needed and filtration requirements are less critical. These fabrics reduce localized shear failure in weak subsoil conditions and aid construction over soft subsoils. Woven monofilament geotextiles are preferred for applications where both strength and filtration are a concern, such as shoreline rip rap applications.

Geotextile-related materials such as fabrics formed into mats, webs, nets, grids, or formed plastic sheets are not the same as geotextiles. These would fall under the more general category of geosynthetics.

So the Geo-Textiles are subset of Geo-synthetics.

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Various applications of Geosynthetics in one picture.


GEOTRST main products include various size and colors of PP/PET woven and non-woven fabrics, such as geotextilesgeotextile containers (geotextile bagstubes and shipping containers), silt fence, geogird, geosynthetics and so on.

We welcome new and old customers from all walks of life to contact us for future business relationships and achieving mutual success!

More information on geotextile, please visit http://www.geotrstgroup.com/geotextile/woven-geotextile/polypropylene-woven-geotextile-for-turf.html